March 2018 Audiobook Bestsellers is proud to present the March 2018 audiobook bestseller list that captures what’s selling in independent bookstores nationwide.


1. The Woman in the Window

by A. J. Finn (HarperCollins)

2. Pachinko

by Min Jin Lee (Hachette Audio)

3. Little Fires Everywhere

by Celeste Ng (Penguin Random House Audio)

4. The Immortalists

by Chloe Benjamin (Penguin Random House Audio)

5. A Wrinkle in Time

by Madeleine L’Engle (Penguin Random House Audio)

6. An American Marriage

by Tayari Jones (HighBridge; Recorded Books; Algonquin Books)

7. Lincoln in the Bardo

by George Saunders (Penguin Random House Audio)

8. The Great Alone

by Kristin Hannah (Macmillan Audio)

9. The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas (HarperCollins)

10. Sing, Unburied, Sing

by Jesmyn Ward (Simon & Schuster Audio)


1. The Line Becomes a River

by Francisco Cantú (Penguin Random House Audio)

2. Sapiens

by Yuval Noah Harari (HarperCollins)

3. Hillbilly Elegy

by J. D. Vance (HarperCollins)

4. Just Mercy

by Bryan Stevenson (Penguin Random House Audio)

5. The Long Haul

by Finn Murphy (HighBridge, Recorded Books, W.W. Norton)

6. Alexander Hamilton

by Ron Chernow (Penguin Random House Audio)

7. Killers of the Flower Moon

by David Grann (Penguin Random House Audio)

8. Norse Mythology

by Neil Gaiman (HarperCollins)

9. Hunger

by Roxane Gay (HarperCollins)

10. Never Split the Difference

by Chris Voss & Tahl Raz (HarperCollins)

The March 2018 audiobook bestseller list is based on sales through independent bookstore locations during the month of February 2018.

Narrator Spotlight: Top 10 Bestselling Audiobooks

Behind every amazing audiobook on is a narrator that brings the author’s words to life. These narrators are responsible for transporting us to another world even as we work, run errands, work out, or commute. This week we recognize the narrators of the Top Ten Bestselling Audiobooks of 2017.

Which of these narrators’ works do you enjoy?

The 166-person cast
that narrated Lincoln in the Bardo

This huge cast includes celebrity voices such as Nick Offerman, Lena Dunham, David Sedaris, and many others. It is impossible to recognize every narrator in this post, but that’s a large part of what makes this audiobook unforgettable.

Nicholas Guy Smith
Narrator of A Gentleman in Moscow

Nicholas Guy Smith’s expressive voice transports the listener to the Metropol and takes them on the count’s journey, even as he remains in the same room for decades. “I always keep the listeners in mind during the narration. How can I keep them connected to the story?” – Nicholas Guy Smith

J.D. Vance
Author and Narrator of Hillbilly Elegy

A former marine and Yale Law School graduate, J.D. Vance gives a powerful account–through both his writing and narration–of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town, offering a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class.

Hillary Rodham Clinton
Author and Narrator of What Happened

In her most personal memoir yet, Hillary Rodham Clinton reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history. Who better to narrate this story than the woman that lived it?

Neil Gaiman
Author and Narrator of Norse Mythology

Neil Gaiman breathes new life into Norse Myths with both prose and narration. And he encourages the listener to become the narrator! He says of these stories, “The fun comes in telling them yourself–something I warmly encourage you to do, you person reading this. Read the stories in this book, then make them your own.”

David Sedaris
Author and Narrator of Theft by Finding

David Sedaris is the ideal narrator for a bestselling audiobook made up of his own experiences and observations and told with his own misanthropic sense of humor and generosity of spirit.

Bahni Turpin
Narrator of The Hate U Give and The Underground Railroad

Bahni Turpin’s brings these two important and unforgettable stories to life with her commitment to accurately expressing the stories and their characters. She says, “I like to give each one a characterization and really try to read the way I feel the text should be heard.”

Sherman Alexie
Author and Narrator of You Don’t Have to Say You Love Me

No one could have better narrated his deeply moving memoir than Sherman Alexie himself. This audiobook is a powerful exploration of family, love, loss, and forgiveness.

Hope Davis
Narrator of Commonwealth

Hope Davis’ rendering of Commonwealth is both fluid and engaging as she tells the story of how a chance romantic encounter sets in motion the dissolution of two marriages and the joining of two families.

The #5 Bestselling Audiobook of 2017: Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

In Norse Mythology, the #5 bestselling audiobook of 2017, Neil Gaiman brings to life the gods of ancient Nordic legend. Through his deft and witty prose, Norse gods emerge with their fiercely competitive natures, their susceptibility to being duped and to duping others, and the tendency to let passion ignite their actions.

“Master storyteller Neil Gaiman brings to life the Norse gods as only he can, from their origins to their twilight. Find out why the handle on Thor’s hammer was forged too short, and how poetry is said to have come into the world. Comic book fans and fantasy readers alike are sure to treasure these classic myths.”

—Aubrey W., Powell’s City of Books, Portland, OR

Best of the Bookternet: February 2016

Though it is the shortest month of the year, February was full of exciting bookish news, reviews, and celebrations. Award nominations, Black History Month, book blogger extravaganzas and more dominated our news feed this month. Here are some of the best articles, blog posts, and announcements that were on our radar.

Audies - Wide

Audies Award Finalists

The short list in each of the 2016 Audie Award categories have been announced. Many of the categories have fierce competition, but perhaps none more so than “Best Narration by the Author,” which includes Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson, The Art of Asking by Amanda Palmer, Born with Teeth by Kate Mulgrew, I Must Say by Martin Short, and Thirteen Ways of Looking by Colum McCann.

Via Audiofile Magazine

Nebula - Wide

Announcing the 2015 Nebula Award Nominees

Speaking of awards, the shortlist for the Nebula Awards were also announced. The Nebula Awards are for various categories in the realm of science fiction and fantasy, and are chosen by the professional organization Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Best Novel nominees this year include The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin, Ancillary Mercy by Ann Leckie, The Grace of Kings by Ken Liu, and Uprooted by Naomi Novik, among others.


Fragile Things - Wide

Instruction in the Event You Find Yourself in a Neil Gaiman Story

What to do if you should wind up in a twisty, fantastical, nothing-is-as-it-seems Neil Gaiman story? The folks at BookRiot offer some neat advice, including “Expect angels, but expect nothing of them. They have their own jobs to do.”

Via BookRiot

Octavia E. Butler - Wide

Read Octavia E. Butler’s Inspiring Message to Herself

Some of sci-fi mastermind Octavia E. Butler’s journals have recently surfaced, including this powerful note, scribbled on the back cover of one. It reads in part: “My novels will go onto the above lists whether publishers push them hard or not, whether I’m paid a high advance or not, whether I ever win another award or not.” Go read the rest and get inspired!

Via Electric Literature

Alison Bechdel - Wide

Alison Bechdel: Top Ten Books

One Grand Books has a tradition of asking famous authors for their ten favorite books. This month, they turned to graphic memoirist Alison Bechdel, who included The Dharma Bums, The Night Watch, and Harriet the Spy, among others.

Via One Grand Books

Books - Wide

Bookstore Sales Had First Gain in Eight Years in 2015

Good news, everyone! Bookstore sales increased 2.5% last year. Remember to #ChooseIndie to help keep the trend going strong.

Via Publisher’s Weekly

Bars - Wide

Welcome to the World of Literary Bars

Next time you’re in the mood for an adult beverage, stop in at one of these bookish bars. Settle down in a leather chair, pull some Hemingway from the shelf and order yourself a mojito.

Via Paste Magazine

Get Info - Wide

Get Information

Unless you’ve taken a vow of internet abstinence, you’ve undoubtedly heard all about Beyoncé’s new song and video “Formation.” Whether you’re tired of all of the think pieces or on your thousandth view of the video, this excellent post from independent bookstore The Strand sheds a bookish light on the song.

Via The Strand

Girl - Wide

The ‘Girl’ in the Title: More than a Marketing Trend

What’s up with titles like, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Gone Girl, and The Girl on the Train? Is it just a coincidence, or is it all about marketing the book? NPR examines the trend.


Blogger - Wide

Book Blogger Day 2: Interviews

Book Blogger Appreciation Week was this month, in which we all take a moment to thank bloggers, who supply endless bookish resources. One of the traditions of BBAW is the blogger interview, in which bloggers interview each other. It is a great way to find out about the world of blogging and pick up a few more titles for your to-be-read list.

Via Estella’s Society

All throughout the month, we’ve been tweeting recommendations for Black History Month. In March, we’ll do the same for Women’s History Month. Make sure to follow us at @librofm to hear all of our suggestions!

Best of the Bookternet: January 2016

By all accounts, 2016 is off to a great start. This month has been chock-full of interesting articles, exciting news, and passionate advice. Here are some of our favorite essays, blog posts, and lists since the first of the year.


Why the British Tell Better Children’s Stories

The Atlantic makes a case for imagination and fantasy over morality in children’s lit. What do you say? Huck Finn or Narnia?

Via The Atlantic


The Time My Grown-Up Novel Was Marketed as Young Adult

Speaking of children’s literature and genre, Lit Hub digs deeper into how these labels affect marketing and ultimately, sales. Kate Axelrod explains the complications that lead to mislabeling her book.

Via Lit Hub

Gene Luen Yang
Photo: First Second Books

The War Over Comic Books Is Nearly Over, and Kids Are Winning

Like audiobooks, graphic novels (AKA comic books) have recently risen in popularity and received critical acclaim. In fact, Gene Luen Yang, author of American Born Chinese was named National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature.



Infographic: Analyzing Shakespeare’s Characters

Not interested in YA? All right then, this one is for you. This infographic explores the relationships between characters in Shakespeare’s tragedies.

Via Electric Literature

Neil Gaiman
Photo: Huffington Post

The Gaiman List

Author (and fantastic narrator!) Neil Gaiman makes a case for his favorite audiobooks, including Bleak House, Bag of Bones, and, of course, The Art of Asking.

Via HarperCollins


Author Amy Tan “Thrilled” By Bloodsucking Leech Named in Her Honor

A new species of leech, Chtonobdella tanae, has been named for author Amy Tan. Leeches feature prominently in her book, Saving Fish from Drowning, and she is reported to be tickled by the homage.

Via Gizmodo


Classic Characters You May Not Remember from Children’s Literature

OK, OK, one last kid-lit article. Check out this satirical post on, rounding up characters such as Sarah who lives in Heidi’s shadow and Mary Poppins’s creepy sister.

Via The Toast


Going Places

Did you know that Washington, D.C. bookstore Politics & Prose double as travel agents? For years they’ve been curating travel in France. This year, they’re expanding to Tuscany, Cuba, and more.

Via Politics & Prose


Finalists Named for 2016 PW Bookstore of the Year

More great indie bookstore news! Publisher’s Weekly has released their finalists for bookstore and sales rep of the year. Bookstore nominees include Village Books, Greenlight Bookstore, and more fantastic indies.

Via Publisher’s Weekly


25 More Hard Truths About Writing and Publishing

Attention writers! Zeroes author Chuck Wendig dishes out the facts about writing, publishing, and marketing books. Most surprising? Just how much influence your Twitter following does or does not have in selling books.


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Amanda Palmer on Recording Her Audiobook, the Weird Places She Writes, and Fear

If you already follow Amanda Palmer, author of The Art of Asking, on Twitter, then you probably know that lately she’s been busy grieving, battling Lyme Disease, recording with her father, and preparing to have her first baby with her husband Neil Gaiman. So we were incredibly pleased that she took time out from her nonstop, go-go-go life, to answer a few questions for us via email.

[Judy Oldfield] My understanding of the way audiobooks are made is that narrators—even when it’s the author narrating their own work—are given a script that they can’t stray from. It’s hard for many authors. Was it hard for you?

[AP] No, it wasn’t hard. It was actually really helpful to be in the recording studio at that exact moment. I was in New York for three straight days of recording and the book itself was in final editing stages, which meant that I was sitting there with a pencil, changing lines, scratching out repetitive words, saying things like, “Wait . . . that doesn’t actually makes sense, does it?” And I’d stop and ask the audio engineers, “Does that makes sense?” And they acted as editors along with me.

So in a sense, I was still finishing up the script, and lucky for me. Because reading aloud brings new problems into light that silent reading just doesn’t highlight. And it also really solidified my own personal relationship with the book, to just sit there for three days and read the whole thing, in front of an audience, even if the audience was just audio engineers and a rep from the publisher. It was like doing a live performance and seeing how the emotional arcs actually hit me, and hit the people listening. Truth be told, there were two or three times I looked out the studio into the control room and made sure they were crying . . . or at least close to crying. I choked up at least three times.

[JO] In The Art of Asking, you wrote about needing a lot of privacy in order to create. What’s the most unusual place you’ve written something (be it blog posts, your book, or music)?

[AP] Ha. Well—I’ve written in a lot of strange places, especially since getting a phone and being able to leave myself notes and voice memos anytime. Bathrooms everywhere. Friends’ homes. Subways. Closets at parties. One of my favorite birth-spots for a full song was in a keg room of a nightclub in Portland, OR, where I wrote “Astronaut”. I held a gun to my head that night because the guy I was writing it about was in the audience for one night and one night only. And so I just did it. An immediate audience has often been my mother of invention.

[JO] People have very strong opinions on you and your work. I have a friend who says that listening to your former band The Dresden Dolls got her through her divorce. But I’ve also read critics who’ve dismissed you for anything from your appearance to your mistakes (real or perceived). Any idea why you provoke such strong responses from people?

[AP] Sure. I think people with strong emotions elicit strong emotions. It used to bother me more, but I’ve come to realize that it’s just part of the game of life. It’s especially true when you’re a woman, and the more of the world I see, the more I see people being fearful of women who live out loud, mistakes or no. And I figure my job is just to get on with it, and not to cower, and not to try to please people.

[JO] Your TED Talk has 7 million views. Your book, The Art of Asking, is a bestseller. What’s the most surprising thing that’s happened to you because of the talk or the book?

[AP] The most surprising? Honestly the most surprising thing is when I’m walking down the street in New York and a super bad-ass looking hoodlum-esque teenager passes me on the street, takes his headphones off, and says, “Wait, are you that TED girl? I just saw your TED talk and I loved it. That asking shit is dope.” That’s happened multiple times. And I’m always astoundingly happy.

[JO] You’ve recently gone back to crowdfunding, though in a newer, more sustainable way. How has Patreon helped you as an artist?

It’s liberated me. There’s 5,500 people currently entrusting me with their credit cards basically saying, “Go ahead and make art, and charge as needed, forever,” which feels like a massive relief and responsibility at the same time. It’s like I got access, suddenly, to a magic highway spur that bypasses the entirety of the mass media, the music industry, and the entire establishment.

But there are moments when it just feels surreal to be so far off the grid, with absolutely nobody in the “real world” paying attention to the madness that is going on outside the city.

But then again, that’s the modern world. There’s always so much going on nowadays that you don’t know about. Sometimes it feels like me and my fans live in a cave, and I worry that we need more air.

[JO] is a new company. We’re the independent bookstore for digital audiobooks. As a writer, an entrepreneur, and an advocate of independent bookstores, what advice do you have for us?

[AP] Don’t let Amazon and Audible get you down.

[JO] What challenges or fears are you facing right now? What are you doing to overcome them?

Oh dear lord . . . nice timing. I’m eight months pregnant. I have NO IDEA what is about to happen to me, I feel like I’m about to fall of an existential cliff, and I’m just bracing myself for an unknown reality over which I will have little control. And what am I doing to overcome them? Nothing, really, except trying to put every piece of zen wisdom I’ve ever lean red into practice. There is only now, now and now. And now. Whatever happens: birth, death, change, catastrophe . . . it will still be now, and it will still be fine. There is never ever any space for regret or fear. It’s poison.

The Art of Asking is our Book of the Month. Use the code WeLoveAmanda at check out to get 25%.

Book of the Month: The Art of Asking

Each month, the Libro team selects a book that we believe will spark dialogue and discussion for our listeners. Our goal is to create an open space for our audiobook listening community to ponder ideas, pick minds, and talk about what we love most: books. This month we’ve chosen The Art of Asking: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help by Amanda Palmer.

I was initially drawn to this novel after hearing about Amanda Palmer’s fascinating life story, one that wanders down many paths but ultimately ends in the single realization that asking is a key component of success in life. Frozen as a living statue, Amanda Palmer posed in a wedding dress asking passersby for their pocket change. As a musician, she asked for the literal support of her audience as she flung herself into their arms crowdsurfing. And when Palmer asked fans to support her independent album, she was met with the world’s most successful music Kickstarter. Amanda Palmer is a singer-songwriter, crowdfunding pioneer, and TED speaker, who is definitely not afraid to ask for help. Her TED Talk, on which this book is based, has more than seven million views.

In her memoir, Palmer delves into a paralyzing fear so many people face, that of admitting to needing and asking for help, and how it affects their lives and relationships (including her marriage to novelist Neil Gaiman). Through her revelations, she discovers the emotional, philosophical, and practical aspects of asking for help.

The Art of Asking will inspire its readers to rethink their ideas about asking, giving, art, and life. There is a piece of advice for everyone here—something to take away, apply, or learn from. Not only do her ideas have practical applications in real life relationships and day-to-day situations, but also in career and business decisions. I loved her thoughts on building community. In asking for help we allow others to support us. Moments like this are the foundation for relationships, communities, and life. Palmer tells us of the value in taking risks by asking for what we want and need, a skill most people shy from. Palmer flips the idea of asking as “weakness” on its head, calls it strength, and shows her audience that some of the best creations are those that are built together.

I also absolutely loved the music this audiobook features. It’s a special addition not found in most books. Hearing both her songs and writing allowed me to grasp the entirety of all that is Amanda Palmer, to see her from all sides as a musician, performer, speaker, and writer.

This is a book that speaks for itself. Amanda Palmer has a unique perspective full of valuable, applicable, and unparalleled ideas on life. Palmer’s story is just plain interesting, so it’s no wonder that her words spring to life and make for a tremendously entertaining listen.

The Art of Asking is our August Book of the Month. Make sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to join our month-long conversation.

Indie Picks: May 2015

Independent booksellers are the best book curators out there, so each month we’re going to highlight what our friends at indie bookstores are reading (and listening to). Here’s what Andrea, Hannah, Kirstyn, Lily, and Matt from McLean & Eakin Booksellers are recommending.


McLean & Eakin Booksellers

Petoskey, Michigan


American Gods

By Neil Gaiman

Considered by many to be the ultimate masterpiece from a master of storytelling, and winner of the Hugo, Nebula, Locus and Bram Stoker Awards, American Gods is a powerful piece of fantasy that will appeal to lovers of the genre and skeptics alike. Shadow has been released from prison just after the death of his beloved wife. Out of the blue, he is approached by a stranger calling himself Mr. Wednesday, who offers him a job. With nothing to lose, Shadow takes it and finds himself thrown into the center of a conflict for the very soul of America. You see, the old gods are not dead, they have merely taken on new forms and identities as their former worshippers moved across the Atlantic. They live here, in America and they, the old gods of Egypt, Russia, Scandinavia, Africa, the British Isles and everywhere else that has yielded immigrants to the New World, are fighting for everything they have created against the new gods of technology and business that have arisen on the new soil. What could, in the hands of a less skilled writer, have become an overdramatic and overwritten fantasy, is, in Gaiman’s hands, a dark and gripping tale that cuts to the heart of what it is to be human.




By Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner

Everyone lies. Realtors lie to sell property faster. Holding out to sell your home for an extra $10,000 only means $150 for the realtor, so waiting for a better price isn’t always the priority they tell you it is. Our law enforcement lie to create or hide “crises” when it serves them to do so. In the run up to the Atlanta Olympics, law enforcement grossly under reported violent crime to increase their chances of winning the Olympic bid. They continue to do so; the Atlanta police department “lost” more than 22,000 reports in 2002 alone! But guess what? There is one thing that doesn’t lie: it’s the numbers Steven D. Levitt, an economist with the University of Chicago, uses the numbers to give greater definition to what many of us see as a very grey world. He is not the kind of economist who is interested in the trade deficit or inflation rates. No, he wants to know if drug dealers make so much why do many still live at home or if naming your child “Loser” will ruin his/her life. Levitt asks these questions and many more in his book, Freakonomics and lets the numbers do the answering. This is the kind of book that will drive your friends and family crazy because you won’t be able to shut up about it.



Seriously . . . I’m Kidding

By Ellen DeGeneres

Ellen is one of those people that just make me laugh, no matter what it is that she says. Reading her book was no different. I had to stop myself from laughing out loud in public places. This is just a cute, goofy book, that is a great way to pass time if you enjoy her humor. Ellen seems to be telling parts of her story, some of which I still do not know if they are true. The book is compiled from short journals, stories, and other forms of her writing, that don’t always make since, but still entertain. If you are looking for a quick, entertaining book, you need to pick this one up!



My Story

By Elizabeth Smart & Chris Stewart

I know what you’re thinking. How could I ever be so in love with a memoir written by a girl who was abducted from her bedroom at knife-point. I do not have an answer for you. However, I cannot remember a book that I got lost in as much as Elizabeth Smart’s My Story. Don’t get me wrong, there are certainly some points in the book that made me cringe and wonder how on earth Elizabeth was able to pen what many of us would think was unimaginable. I think that’s what made me fall so in love with this book. Elizabeth is smart and leaves no rock unturned as she recounts the events she was forced to experience and how she survived them. Elizabeth is truly one of my heroes after learning of her strength and courage to remain optimistic in the darkest of times. It may have taken her 10 years to write, but I am so glad that she didn’t allow anybody else to tell her story. Elizabeth is truly and inspiration and we could all use even a little bit of her strength and courage.




By Veronica Roth

In a world where everyone must fit themselves into one of five factions, choices about how to live your life are extremely limited. Sixteen-year-old Beatrice Prior has more choices than most: when she takes the compulsory test that is supposed to reveal a sixteen-year-old’s suitability for a certain faction, her results are “inconclusive”. She shows equal ability for membership in Abnegation, the selfless faction of her birth; Dauntless, the courageous faction that has always fascinated her; and Erudite, the so-called “genius” faction that she despises. In a nutshell, she is Divergent. When Beatrice chooses a faction, Dauntless, the hard part is supposed to be over. But the truth is far from it. If Beatrice, now calling herself Tris, wants to be Dauntless, she must rank in the top ten of her group of initiates, some of whom have been preparing for this all of their lives. The rankings are decided by violent fights, random acts of daring and idiocy, excruciatingly painful tests that delve into the fabric of your fears, and frankly, whether or not those in charge despise you. In the weeks that follow her choice, Tris must remake herself in the image of the Dauntless, figure out a complicated relationship with an enigmatic instructor named Four, and most of all, watch her back: Divergence isn’t safe, and there are people who want her dead. Divergent is a fascinating read, and is entirely un-put-downable. The realistic and utterly human characters of Tris, Four, and their friends and family, as well as their intriguing world, draw in you into the story and keep you there. It is a fresh and show-stopping addition to the ranks of teen literature, and is sure to delight anyone who is tired of the same-old, same-old.


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